Home Shop Classified News, Stories Events Education Ridecamp Videos Cartoons AERC
Endurance.Net Home Ridecamp Archives
ridecamp@endurance.net
[Archives Index]   [Date Index]   [Thread Index]   [Author Index]   [Subject Index]

Re: [RC] automatic vs. stick - heidi

 The one thing to think about is if you were at a ride by yourself and
got an injury to say a shoulder or leg  and were driving a stick - how
would you get yourself, your horse and your rig home with a stick?

You'd be surprised, Truman, at how well many of us old stick-shift drivers
can manage with a wounded limb.  I had carpal tunnel surgery on my right
hand on a Friday (just three weeks ago) and was driving my stick-shift
Powerstroke to work by Monday morning.  The gear shift is tall enough that
I think it is easier for a short little stubby like me to reach over and
shift it with my left hand than it is to get a lot of automatics into gear
with the wrong hand.  (Of course, Í'm a damnfool endurance rider--I didn't
even take time off of work to have carpal tunnel surgery done...)

And although I've done some pretty crazy things to get myself home after
injuries in past years, I'd also submit that if it is very far home and
you are hurt that bad, you shouldn't be driving in an automatic, either!

Heidi (who can recall getting home from at least one training ride in a
stick shift with a mangled and non-functional right leg)


============================================================
We are talking about all the tools we can use to keep our horses safe and
alive at the rides. Training/conditioning is one of the best tools
available. It makes us better horseman and women, it benefits our horses
and could quite possibly be the key to preventing most crashes.
~ Lisa Salas - The Odd Farm

ridecamp.net information: http://www.endurance.net/ridecamp/

============================================================

Replies
[RC] automatic vs. stick, Scott Johnson
Re: [RC] automatic vs. stick, Charles
Re: [RC] automatic vs. stick, Truman Prevatt