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Re: [RC] "pound dog" mentality for horses? - Chris Paus

I love rags to riches stories. I'm not the least bit
sorry I "saved" Starman. He's been a terrific horse. 

I'm not sorry I saved my broodmares or my stallion.
They are evidence that well bred horses can fall on
hard times and sometimes just need a chance to show
what they can do.

My only caution to bargain shoppers is that you pay on
one end or the other. I got Star for a song, but have
paid dearly for training and coaching and just in the
time and sweat I've put into him, not to mention trips
to the ER when he and I parted company 11 times in our
first year together.

I don't expect big bucks for the horses I breed. I
think I set reasonable prices, so people can think
about getting a nice prospect without getting sticker
shock. 

T-man, you or I probably could go to an auction and
pick up a bargain horse and find it an appropriate job
and have a happy ever after story.

I have a big concern for the people who are very new
to horses and they look only at price and look at off
track horses or auction horses or very young horses to
save money. They are clueless that these generally are
not horses you can just hop on and ride away. They or
the horse or both end up getting frustrated and hurt.

I see it all too often in the people who come call me
for help when they get the wrong horse and are in over
their heads. It's not just and endurance thing.

However, back to the original thread, there is weird
notion out there amongst non distance riders that any
horse without a good whoa is for some reason an
endurance prospect!

chris
--- Truman Prevatt <tprevatt@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

But I can find a lot of these "type" of horses for
sale in the paper or 
even at <shudder> the auctions - at least in FL. So
if a person can go 
get a great deal on a horse from these sources -
then why go spend prime 
dollar from a breeder?  That's the question. From
the piece on NPR - the 
horse didn't do that well on the track and clearly
must not have done 
that well as a pack horse. He was bought by a smart
rider who saw the 
potential - independent of the fact he was for sell
in the paper for a 
thousand bucks.

I do feel sorry for "endurance breeders." We riders
are cheap. There are 
a lot of good horses out there so we don't have to
spend a lot of money. 
Many riders don't have the money to spend but want
to participate in the 
sport and thank goodness there are good horses out
there for them at a 
reasonable price. That is why this sport is growing
in popularity.  It 
doesn't cost an arm and leg to get into and you
don't have to have a 
$25,000 horse or get looked down on by everyone else
involved.  Not to 
even mention that while a lot of people ride Arabs -
they don't have to. 
Hell they can even ride <shudder> mules:-).



=====
"A good horse makes short miles," George Eliot

Chris and Star

BayRab Acres
http://pages.prodigy.net/paus

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Re: [RC] "pound dog" mentality for horses?, Truman Prevatt