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Re: [RC] [RC] [RC] [RC] RideCamp -LDs. - Truman Prevatt

Actually in human foot racing the sprints are a very limited set of events. They are normally the races a runner can complete anaerobically.  This would be the 60 meters (indoors) and the 100 and 200 outdoors. Traditionally the 400 is called a "long sprint" - in may the 200 was the long sprint and the 400 was considered a middle distance event. It cannot be run anaerobically but there are some people that are very good at it, but that is all they seem to be good at. Michael Johnson is the first human ever to be world class in the 200 and 400. The middle distance events are the 800 and mile ( metric or statute ). The distance events are 5 k, 10 k, 20 k and marathon. It turns out that very few runners have been world class in more than one distance event. They seem to be very specialized. 

I don't see anyone whining. All I see is a legitimate questioning of why endurance is what it is as currently defined and if there might not be a better way - considering the current membership of the AERC. The AERC is the members, the defintions and rules are living breathing documents. Questioning the status quo is always good.

Truman

heidi@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx wrote:
For the analogy to marathon and 10 k to be valid
there would need to be separate events for each distance, 50, 55, 60,
65, etc.
    

<sigh>  There are!  They are called 50s, 55s, 60s, etc.  And I know that
over the years, AERC HAS offered stats on these different distances.  Yes,
their points all count toward "endurance"--but are they any different from
a group of races called "sprints" and then labeled 50, 100, 220, etc.?  I
think not.

No matter HOW it is written, SOMEBODY will pick it apart and whine.

Heidi



  

--
We imitate our masters only because we are not yet masters ourselves, and only

We imitate our masters only because we are not yet masters ourselves, and only

because in doing so we learn the truth about what cannot be imitated.

 


Replies
RE: [RC] [RC] [RC] [RC] RideCamp -LDs., Rae Callaway
Re: [RC] [RC] [RC] [RC] RideCamp -LDs., Truman Prevatt
Re: [RC] [RC] [RC] [RC] RideCamp -LDs., heidi