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Re: [RC] [RC] How should a horse back? - Laurie Durgin

Thanks ,I know this.I don't do it this way. I give little 'dressage type cues' But he sometimes ignores me and goes forward thru the bit.(ah, yes, he does tend to disregard the bit).It only works this way, a)if I have him faced into the fence, or am on the ground. I am working on transitions, different bits and one rein stop to get him to stop going through the bit.I have a french link snaffle, low port hinged myler and a S hack A harsher bit does work better, BUT I want to train him to cues , not just pain.And when speed enters or excitment if it is a harsher bit , he will start tossing his head(long time ago I used a pelham on others advice.,learned that is a good way to make him toss his head and buck) I can really pull on the snaffle if he's excited, and 'eventually' he listened, but at least I didn't get head flipping and bucking. He just wants to do what he wants. . .(But that was more in the beginning, I can rate him some with half halts, at least while alone or with someone he knows).
Something he needs ,and now is a good time and we are gearing up to re-condition. My aim is for the best trained horses I can manage, with the time I have (and I have more than most)
I have found with my green mare and now 3 yr old surprise, that if they are made to back on the ground (like whenever I feed I make them back up a step or two) they seem to transfer it much quicker and nonresistant under saddle.. R mus thave missed those lessons, He was not really trained , just ridden so I hav eot undo mistakes and lapses. I think sometimes you just have to dig in and outlast them.
I did try carrots on 2 occasions, he did it real well. I MAY have to do the carrot thing for a few sessions ,till the cue is fixed, then extingush the carrots.Ther have been a few things I have had to work that way.I am not a purist, I will try what works and isn't dangerous or cruel till I they get it. Laurie



Too many people try to get horses to back up by simply hauling back on the reins. This doesn't work--or even if the horse backs up, it will do so in a resisting manner.

To teach a horse to back, one has to "drive" the hindquarters forward and
then limit forward motion with "fixed" hands (does not mean rigid
hands--in fact, you may need to "chat" gently with the mouth to do this,
with small alternating motions of the reins/bit) so that the direction of
motion is backward.  For some reason, the need to use one's legs to get
the horse collected (on the HQ) seems to evade many people when they try
to back up.

Heidi


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