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RE: [RC] speaking of twh/mft - Bob Morris

Look at a Currier and Ives winter scene where the horses are racing, pulling sleighs. We call it a C&I trot!
 

Bob Morris
Morris Endurance Enterprises
Boise, ID

-----Original Message-----
From: ridecamp-owner@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:ridecamp-owner@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of RDCARRIE@xxxxxxx
Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2004 12:27 PM
To: ranch@xxxxxxxxxxx; tamara@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Cc: ridecamp@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: [RC] speaking of twh/mft

In a message dated 1/1/2004 12:36:28 PM Central Standard Time, ranch@xxxxxxxxxxx writes:

You could feel his back end drop, the beats per minute decrease and the speed increase.


This describes exactly what it feels like when my gelding hits what I call his big trot.  He gets lower, especially in the rear, I feel him widen out, he lowers his head and neck, and there is no more "up and down" motion - no need to post.  All of the movement is just incredibly powerful forward thrusting...I just 2-point.  My husband has seen him do it and describes him as getting "long and low."  Everytime I think he's going as fast as he can go at a trot, another ride will come along and he'll go even faster.  We had 5 other horses galloping to keep up with him at one 50 - had I not been there, I would not have believed a horse could trot that fast.  He kept it up for about 2 miles over a hilly, mostly uphill, course till I slowed him down.  It's an incredible feeling - exhilerating.

Dawn in East Texas

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Re: [RC] speaking of twh/mft, RDCARRIE