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[RC] [RC] Springtie vs TieRite - Dream Weaver

Hi Denise - I have a comparison page here:  http://members.tripod.com/ridephotos/horse/ties.html

I've been using the hi-ties (from sportack . com) for several years. I have no connection to Sportack and do not benefit in any way from anything I'm about to say.

I think the hi-tie system is the best there is on the market for confining a horse.  There is no 100% safe way to confine a horse, however, some ways are safer than others.  I've seen every kind of accident there can be involving horses with various confinement systems.  The most dangerous in my opinion are:  1)  portable electric corrals, 2)  corral panels 3) tying directly to trailer or to a tie-arm (hi-tie type product).  I believe that most accidents that are on a tie-arm are less serious than the others.

I like the hi-tie because it is not as flexible as some others.  Others that flex more will drive you NUTS at night with the constant squeak, squeak, squeak that occurs.  It makes me want to post a sign that says if you are using a certain type of tie-arm to pleez don't park next to me - I want to sleep the night before a ride!  I also have seen that horses tied on the tie arms that move and flex more that those horses learn to pull over time.  I don't want my horses doing that. 

Most important thing about any confinement system is to train a horse in advance of going to a ride.  Spend several nights allowing the horse or horses to be tied or confined that way. 

Remember too, that it's not just your horse - it's every other horse in camp that you have to consider.  Several times I have seen one, two or more loose horses run through camp tearing everything down in their path. First to go are electric corrals, then panels.  Usually my horses are always left standing (even if rattled), on their hi-ties.  Once I even had electric tape wrapped around the legs of one of my horses - who was still left tied on his hi-tie, while the horse that *had* been in the electric corral panel had disappeared off into the forest at 3 a.m. 

As far as placement of a tie-arm - be sure to place far enough apart so the horses cannot get tangled up together.  Good idea also to follow some of the advice in my link above - use cotton ropes, and no bungees or quick release directly to the halter for securing a horse. 

My experience:  I spend probably an average of 3 months a year with one or two horses (sometimes three) tied on my hi-ties which equates overall to years worth of time on these things and have tried many other confinement systems over the years.  I have never had a single tie-arm break. 

Karen