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[RC] Suspensory injury...a more thorough evaluation - Cynthia Eyler

Spent two and a half hours yesterday with another vet, hoping to find out the seriousness of my 15 year old QH's RF suspensory injury.  Talk about opening a can of worms!
 
From palpation, the vet didn't think the suspensory was much of an issue.  Circled Jack from the ground and rode him in small-ish circles.  Two nerve blocks on the leg opposite the suspensory in question.  Vet (and another vet from the practice) thought they saw multiple issues.  Flexion tests on the hind legs.  Ultrasound of the questionable suspensory.  X-rays of the front foot opposite the suspensory in question.  X-rays of the hock diagonal to the suspensory in question.
 
Other than the shots for the nerve blocks, Jack took it all like a trooper.
 
Results?  The suspensory injury barely shows up on ultrasound.  As the original vet declared after only palpation, it's not a big deal.  Vet was surprised at how clean the hock x-rays were.  BUT, there are definite navicular changes in his front feet.
 
Jack will be on vacation until spring, after which we'll work up to regular, vigorous trail riding.  But no more 50 milers.  And no more work in sand.  And I'm on the lookout for a really good instructor that has school horses I can ride this winter.
 
Jack is the only horse I have ever owned (started riding in the second half of my 40's), and I don't know if I'll get another.  In any case, there's no room right now for another horse at the friend's farm where I keep him.  In the meantime, I'll be at some endurance rides, volunteering or crewing.
 
Endurance was something I wanted to do, just for the challenge of it.  I'd still like to do it, but...
 
Cindy