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Re: [RC] selenium - David & Maggie

Selenium deficiency also causes birth defects in cattle, so I would assume it may have similar effects on horses. My father had a calf born from a SE deficient cow. He couldn't straighten his front legs, or bend the fetlocks of his hind legs. Cute little guy, though. Dad kept him pampered in a padded stall until he was big enough to eat. Sold the cow to a dairy.
 
Maggie Pritchard
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 8:11 PM
Subject: [RC] selenium

When  the soil is deficient in selenium, then the horse doesn't get enough.  I have my main distance horses checked every year for selenium level as MI is very low in selenium.   The harder one works the horse, the higher the selenium level should be.  Average runs between 130 - 180.  My vet tells me that Maggie's should be around 180 or a tad higher.  When her selenium level is low, then her hind end muscles get tight and she tends to act like she is tied up although she isn't.   Very low selenium can also cause the back to be touchy,. Selenium level is tested by taking blood.  I supplement with selenium and vitamin E since they go hand in hand.  Maggie's level last year was 145 and my vet told me to up the amount I was giving her.  One can also get selenium and vitamin e from the grain elevator.  I did but it didn't do the job.  I know of other folks who do, and it works just fine.  Check with your vet before you do anything.  Jeanie 

Replies
[RC] selenium, Larry Miller